Open Sourcing Research Software

In this 15min. primer I’ll take you through the basic steps of open sourcing your research software. It covers purpose of open sourcing, the rights situation, license choice, and the actual step of open sourcing.

The slides and video are also available for download.

Tools for Software Composition Analysis (Philippe Ombredanne, IEEE Computer Column)

I’m happy to report that the tenth article in the Open Source Expanded column of IEEE Computer has been published.

TitleFree and open source software license compliance: Tools for software composition analysis
KeywordsOpen source software, software composition, open source licenses, automation
AuthorsPhilippe Ombredanne, nexB Inc.
PublicationComputer vol. 53, no. 10 (October 2020), pp. 105-109.
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Open Source in Business on Labor Economics

Dave Neary and colleagues recently started a podcast on open source in business. There are already two episodes out, the first one on product management in commercial open source, and the second one on open source and the cloud. Check them out!

Even better yet, yours truly will be on the podcast for the third episode, talking about the labor economics of open source. I first thought we’d be discussing our article on the open source software developer career. However, Dave has much more in store, so don’t miss it and register right away! It will air on September 29th, 2020, at 4pm CEST/11am EDT/8am PDT with a Europe friendly timezone! The episode is live so you can ask questions.

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Where is Open Source in Factory Automation?

An important benefit of an open source project is that it is long-lived and can’t go out of business. Unlike a closed source supplier, which can go bankrupt, your usage and update rights to an open source software can’t suddenly disappear.

From working with customers I know very well that the manufacturers of (comparatively) expensive machines like cars, trains, and planes have long warmed up to open source and appreciate that open source projects will stick around when (some) closed source suppliers are long gone or killed their products.

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Course on Commercial Open Source Startups at UC Santa Cruz

In September 2020, I will be teaching a workshop series on commercial open source startups at UC Santa Cruz (and starting November, as a course, at FAU). The series at UCSC is being faciliated by CROSS, the Center for Research in Open Source Software, and I’m getting help from Thomas Otter (@vendorprisey). If you would like to register, check out the official announcement! If you are affiliated with UC Santa Cruz, talk to Stephanie Lieggi (or me) to get in! If you are just curious, here is the general syllabus.

What to Call Traditional Community Open Source Projects Not Hosted by a Foundation?

A week ago I asked the Twitterverse how to call community open source projects that are not hosted by a foundation. By saying community open source I excluded both commercial open source and corporately-run open source. The options were plain, plain old, traditional, and ungoverned. Ungoverned won with a small margin at 34% of the 111 votes. But this is only a part of the story.

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A Researcher’s Perspective on “Do Developers Care About Open Source?”

Over on Twitter, that endless source of distraction, Matt Asay asked: “Do developers care about open source?” Apparently, he is asking in response to an interview he had with a vendor who claimed that developers don’t care whether their service is available as open source (it is not). According to the vendor, developers just want to use a reliable service (and pay).

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