Open Source Career 2014 Talk Slides, Photos, and Video

The talk “The Open Source Software Developer Career and its Benefits”, which I gave at the 2014 Entwicklertag in Karlsruhe earlier this year, is now fully documented. You can take a look at the original paper, talk slides, event photos, and finally (woohoo!) a quality video recording courtesy of Andrena, the organizers of the Entwicklertag. For simplicity’s sake, below please find an embedded Youtube video (local copy).

The Business of Open Models

I’m at beautiful Schloss Dagstuhl once again this week, for a seminar on “Open Models as a Foundation of Future Enterprise Systems”. I was asked to spin some thoughts on what the Open Models Initiative could learn from open source. The result is a short but sweet presentation on “the business of open models”. My maybe obvious statement is that for open models to be sustainable, they’ll need a business model. My suggestion is to create developer foundations like Apache or Eclipse for this. The slides are available as a PDF and through Slideshare, see below:

Linux-Tag Keynote Slides: A New Developer Career

I just finished my Linux-Tag 2010 keynote and so I’m providing the talk slides here under the Creative Commons BY-SA 3.0 license. First title and abstract:

Title: Open Source: A New Developer Career

Abstract: Open source creates a new career ladder for software developers, orthogonal to the traditional career in software firms. Advancing on this career ladder can win developers broader recognition for their work, increase their salaries, and improve their job security. Software developers, project and hiring managers, and personnel departments alike need to understand this new dimension in a developer’s career. This talk explains the career and discusses what skills a developer should possess or train to be successful.

Then the slides as PDF or below embedded from Slideshare.

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Open Source Software Research Inaugural Lecture at FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg

Last Friday, I presented my inaugural lecture at the Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, as is customary for a new professor. My topic was open source software research, and I’m making the slides available under the Creative Commons BY-SA 3.0 license. The talk took place on April 30th, 2010, during FAU’s 2010 Tag der Informatik (Day of Computer Science). Here is the abstract of the 45min talk:

Open source software has become ubiquitous. In this talk, I lay out a research agenda for my group. By reviewing prior work, I show that open source has not only become ubiquitous but also economically sustainable. I also show what further open source economics work needs to be done. Changing gears, I then address the software engineering research I see ahead for open source. Thanks to the public nature of open source, most relevant project information is easily accessible. I expect this to lead software engineering research to a golden age of empirically founded insights and conclusions. Beyond analysis, I address how our research will innovate new tools and practices using a software forge.

The talk slides are available as a PDF file and are licensed under the Creative Commons BY-SA 3.0 license.

Talk Slides: Design Pattern Density Defined

Here the slides for my OOPSLA Onward! 2009 talk on “Design Pattern Density Defined.” First the abstract:

Design pattern density is a metric that measures how much of an object-oriented design can be understood and represented as instances of design patterns. Expert developers have long believed that a high design pattern density implies a high maturity of the design under inspection. This paper presents a quantifiable and observable definition of this metric. The metric is illustrated and qualitatively validated using four real-world case studies. We present several hypotheses of the metric’s meaning and their implications, including the one about design maturity. We propose that the design pattern density of a maturing framework has a fixed point and we show that if software design patterns make learning frameworks easier, a framework’s design pattern density is a measure of how much easier it will become.

The talk slides are available as a PDF file and are licensed under the Creative Commons BY-SA 3.0 license.

For a discussion of the talk’s contents I recommend reading the original article.

Talk Slides: The Commercial Open Source Business Model

For my AMCIS 2009 talk on the single-vendor commercial open source business model, first the abstract, then the slides:

Commercial open source software projects are open source software projects that are owned by a single firm that derives a direct and significant revenue stream from the software. Commercial open source at first glance represents an economic paradox: How can a firm earn money if it is making its product available for free as open source? This paper presents the core properties of commercial open source business models and discusses how they work… [more]

The talk slides are available as a PDF file and are licensed under the Creative Commons BY-SA 3.0 license.

For a discussion of the talk’s contents I recommend reading the original article.

Micro-Blogging in the Enterprise: Focus Groups Evaluation Results

A couple of weeks ago, Oliver Günther and I reported about the results of the Micro-Blogging in the Enterprise Focus Groups we had undertaken in December 2008. The report was an internal talk at SAP Labs LLC in Palo Alto and drew a record audience. I’m glad to report that we can publish the slides for this talk. Mark Finnern had previously blogged about it. If you are interested in this work, a more comprehensive presentation can be found in our upcoming AMCIS paper on micro-blogging adoption in the enterprise.

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