Pattern Discovery and Validation Using Scientific Research Methods (Technical Report)

Abstract: Pattern discovery, the process of discovering previously unrecognized patterns, is usually performed as an ad-hoc process with little resulting certainty in the quality of the proposed patterns. Pattern validation, the process of validating the accuracy of proposed patterns, has rarely gone beyond the simple heuristic of “the rule of three”. This article shows how to use established scientific research methods for the purpose of pattern discovery and validation. The result is an approach to pattern discovery and validation that can provide the same certainty that traditional scientific research methods can provide for the theories they are used to validate. This article describes our approach and explores its usefulness for pattern discovery and evaluation in a series of studies.

Keywords: Patterns, pattern discovery, pattern validation, theory codification, theory building and evaluation, research design

Reference: Riehle, D., Harutyunyan, N., & Barcomb, A. (2020). Pattern Discovery and Validation Using Scientific Research Methods. Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Dept. of Computer Science, Technical Reports, CS-2020-01, February 2020.

The article is available as a PDF file and on FAU’s OPUS server.

Traditional Theory Building and Validation in (Computer) Science

Many computer science degree programs do a lousy job at teaching science. A high school student, entering university, often has a good idea what science is about, based on their physics and chemistry classes. At least, it involves controlled experiments. At university, this is rarely picked up, and computer science students are given the idea that programming something novel constitutes science. With that idea, they are often bewildered when I teach them rigorous research methods, in particular if those originated in the social sciences (like qualitative interviews or hypothesis-testing surveys).

The process of science
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Summary of the Winter 2019/20 AMOS Projects

This winter semester, students of TU Berlin completed four AMOS projects. Each section below describes the final result of one of the projects:

  1. Logistics Dashboard (an app to provide easy communications between employees),
  2. App4UCU (an app which interacts with the core functions of UCU and shows internal signals),
  3. Configaroo (an app which enables the management of large distributed code bases), and
  4. Ne:xt HMI (an integration of a trip computer app, a podcast app and messaging app to create an integrated car operating system)

The Real Problem with Pay-walled Publications

Pay-walled publications are just that: Publications that nobody reads unless someone pays the publisher’s fee. I have no problem with that, because I don’t read pay-walled work and don’t consider it published research and prior art that I should care about.

The real problem starts with researchers and editors who expect me to find, read, and consider pay-walled work as prior art. That’s an unacceptable proposition to me and an unfair one to the world.

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Ten Years of University Teaching

My research and teaching group just celebrated its tenth anniversary, and I wanted to take some time to reflect on our teaching: What worked and what didn’t.

Principles

When I started as a university professor ten years ago, I drew on my experience as a student, as a teacher, as a practitioner, and as an entrepreneur, to define the basic principles of how I wanted to teach:

  1. Theory and practice should be joined at the hip; there should only be minimal delay, if any, between hearing some concept and applying it in practice
  2. Learning requires repetition and practice, so the theory and practice of something to learn needs to be drawn out over several iterations to become effective
  3. Learning is a marathon, not a sprint; therefore, learning and using the stick (grading) to direct learning should be continuous and not a fire-and-forget exercise
  4. Feedback needs to be immediate and connected to a student’s actual doing, and not come at the end of a semester or later
  5. Learning is holistic; while some concepts can be isolated, more often than not, concepts interact and require a realistic setting to be learned
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Upcoming Industry Talk on Continuous Integration / Delivery / Deployment by Bernard Ramon Ladenthin of IAV GmbH

We will be hosting an industry talk on Continuous Integration / Delivery / Deployment. The talk is free and open to the public.

  • by: Bernard Ramon Ladenthin of IAV GmbH
  • about: Continuous Integration / Delivery / Deployment
  • on: January 23rd, 2020, 08:30 Uhr
  • at: TU Berlin, HFT TA 441 (Lehrstuhl Schieferdecker, Einsteinufer 25)
  • as part of: AMOS speaker series
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Upcoming AMOS Demo Day at IAV’s DigiLab

IAV GmbH (Berlin) will be hosting this winter semester’s AMOS demo day. Four student teams will present the results of their work, ranging from a logistics dashboard, through an ECU dashboard, a Git module configuration tool, to a next generation HMI app for Android Automotive OS.

Date2020-02-06
Time10:15am (start) to 11:45 (end)
LocationIAV DigiLab, Hallerstr. 6, (1tes OG), 10587 Berlin

If you would like to attend, please drop me a note.