Next Three Public Open Source Talks

Next three public talks on open source that I’ll be giving in Germany:

  • Nuremberg, 25.02.10 – Talend Business Lunch, talk topic: Sustainability of Commercial Open Source
  • Hannover, 02.03.10 – CeBIT Open Source Forum keynote: Open Source Software Developer Careers
  • Erlangen, 30.04.10 – Tag der Informatik, Uni Erlangen-N├╝rnberg: Open Source and the Software End-Game

Bringing Open Source Best Practices into Corporations Using a Software Forge

You may have noticed our work on improving corporate software development at SAP using an in-house software forge. The main benefit is in transferring open source best practices to our software development processes. At an upcoming industry conference presentation I’ll be talking about some of the lessons we learned. Here is the abstract of the talk:

Abstract: A software forge is a tools platform for collaborative software development, similar to integrated CASE environments. Unlike CASE tools software forges have been designed for the software development practices of the open source community. Open source software projects succeed where waterfall and agile methods fail: They can cope with changing requirements and they can scale to large project sizes. Thus, corporate software development can learn from open source best practices. In this presentation, I discuss our experiences with using a software forge to bring open source best practices into SAP. We present the design principles and benefits of a firm-internal software forge, and we present a case study of how one project inside SAP benefited significantly from being on the forge.

Reference: Dirk Riehle. “Bringing Open Source Best Practices into Corporations Using a Software Forge.” Talk at SEACON 2009. Hamburg, Germany: 2009.

Six Easy Pieces of Quantitatively Analyzing Open Source Projects

I’ll be giving a talk at the Open Source Business Conference 2009 in San Francisco on March 24, 2009. The talk will present an easily accessible summary of our data-driven analytical work on how open source software development works. Here is the abstract:

For the first time in the history of software engineering, we can both broadly and deeply analyze the behavior and dynamics of software development projects. This has become possible because of open source, which is publicly developed software. In this presentation, I will discuss our recent findings about open source software, its development process, and programmer behavior. I also discuss the challenges we encountered when quantitatively mining software repositories for such insights.

Reference: Talk at OSBC 2009. San Francisco, CA: 2009.

Available as a PDF file.

Open Source Labor Economics…

…is not nearly as sexy a title for an industry talk as is “Open Source Hacker Careers” so it had to go. The result you can observe at the 2009 Open Source Meets Business conference in Nuremberg, Germany, on January 28th, 2009, when I will be giving a talk (almost) so named.

Open Source Software Developer Careers

Open source is changing how software is built and how money is made. Open source also defines a new developer career that is independent of the traditional career within companies. This talk discusses this new career and argues that it creates economic value for some while it makes life harder for others. Suggesting that such a career is worthwhile, the talk then discusses key skills that a developer should possess or train in order to be successful in open source projects.

Bringing Wikipedia to Work: Open Collaboration within Corporations

This upcoming Wikimania 2008 tutorial discusses the three principles of “open collaboration” which I believe are underlying wikis, open source, and other forms of peer production. It is a follow-up to last year’s tutorial about open collaboration at Wikimania 2007.

If the slideshow doesn’t play, please use the PDF file download below.

Reference: Dirk Riehle. “Bringing Wikipedia to Work: Open Collaboration in Corporations.” In Proceedings of Wikimania 2008, forthcoming.

Also available as a PDF file.

Global Open Source Trends and Public Initiatives

I’ll be moderating the experts panel on “Global Open Source Trends and Public Initiatives” at the half-day Global Open Source Conference on March 24th, 2008, in San Francisco. Panel participants are Mark Radcliffe of DLA Piper, Sander Ruiter from the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs, Tony Wasserman of CMU West, and Arnaud Le Hors of IBM. The event precedes the Open Source Business Conference which will start the next day.

Continue reading “Global Open Source Trends and Public Initiatives”

How to Benefit From Open Source

Title: How to Benefit from Open Source

Presenter: Dirk Riehle

Institution: SAP Research, SAP Labs LLC

Abstract: Open source is changing the game of how software is built and how money is made. This talk analyzes the economics of open source software from three main perspectives: The system integrator perspective, the start-up firm perspective, and the individual software developer perspective. A focus is on the distinction between community open source and commercial open source, and how the different stakeholders use different approaches to win in the market, e.g. to gain market share or to keep a job. The dual-license strategy is explained as well as why committers to important open source software projects can expect a higher salary. The talk shows how every stakeholder can benefit and thereby explains why open source is here to stay.

Event/location: Software Engineering Today 2008 (SET 2008) in Zurich, May 6-7th 2008